Category: Arts

Linder-The-Goddess-Who-Makes-All-Principles-Work2017

The Grand Tour

No, not the Amazon Prime version of TopGear with Jeremy ‘Marmite’ Clarkson and his gang. This Grand Tour is a cultural journey across Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire at four of the UK’s most distinguished arts institutions.

Running March to June 2018, this series of landmark exhibitions includes major shows by photomontage artist, Linder Sterling, at Nottingham Contemporary and Chatsworth, a delicate range of lithophanes by Clare Twomey at The Harley Gallery, and a compelling show celebrating ‘The Art of Industry’ at Derby Museums.

The theme across the four exhibitions is the celebration of both the artistic process and the the impact of industrial creation.

Foundry Scene Derby Museums

Foundry Scene Derby Museums

The House of Fame at Nottingham Contemporary (24 March – 24 June 2018) is an ambitious exhibition convened by Linder, informed by her time at Chatsworth. At the heart of the presentation will be a retrospective of Linder’s work, spanning more than 40 years of photomontage, graphics, costume and performance.

Stretching from the early 17th century to today, The House of Fame will host 150 works – drawings, sculptures, furniture, jewellery, photographs, banners – by dozens of artists selected by Linder and will run across all 800 square metres of gallery at Nottingham Contemporary.

In Harley Gallery’s exhibition, Half in Shadow: Half in Light (24 March 2018 – 30 June 2018), British artist Clare Twomey explores life on the historic Welbeck Estate through a series of lithophanes.

Twomey reinvents the traditional technique of the lithophane through a series of portraits of people who live and work on the Welbeck Estate, representing the contemporary life on the grounds. The artist will shed light on the repurposed buildings on the estate such as the Poultry House, the Dairy and the Brewery, depicting people in their working environment and allowing new stories to be told.

Lisa Gee, Director of The Harley Gallery and Foundation says: “It’s incredibly exciting to be working with such an acclaimed artist as Clare Twomey, just months after her exhibition as lead artist at the Tate’s Exchange space opened.

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Linder Untitled, 2018 Courtesy of the artist and Stuart Shave Modern Art

This Grand Tour, British artist Linder Sterling – best known for her photomontages and influential role in punk/post-punk aesthetics – has become the first-ever artist resident at Chatsworth. Linder draws inspiration from the house itself and its exceptional surroundings, using Chatsworth as a kind of ‘sensorium’.

Linder has immersed herself in the life of the stately home and its 500-year history, producing a series of works to be experienced through a variety of senses; creating incense from the aromatic plants on the estate, recording oral stories, and using the everyday sounds of the house for new musical compositions alongside new photomontages. A series of interventions created from her residency will be displayed at Chatsworth between 24 March – 21 October, as part of The Grand Tour programme.

Derby Museum and Art Gallery’s exhibition The Art of Industry: From Joseph Wright to the 21st Century (24 March – 17 June 2018) will look back at the region’s industrial history and manufacturing landscape through both historic artefacts and contemporary artistic interpretation.

The Art of Industry will show the evolving relationship that artists have had with the manufacturing heritage that helps define the Midlands as a hub of industry in the UK.

For more information visit:
www.thegrandtour.uk.com
www.chatsworth.org
www.nottinghamcontemporary.org
www.harleygallery.co.uk
www.derbymuseums.org

Top Featured image: Linder, The Goddess Who Makes All Principles Work, 2017


Fancy-dress-on-Market-Street-Manchester-Les-Telford

Manchester Icon to be Commemorated

An iconic artwork of one of Manchester’s most famous figures is to be created from hundreds of pictures of everyday Mancunians.

Images taken last year at a unique social experiment that captured a day in the life of the city will form the collage of one legendary local.

Artist Nathan Wyburn is asking the public to vote for who he should commemorate in the piece from a shortlist of 12 memorable Mancs:

  • LS Lowry
  • Alan Turing
  • Emmeline Pankhurst
  • Anthony Burgess
  • Caroline Aherne
  • Victoria Wood
  • James Joule
  • Pat Phoenix
  • Les Dawson
  • Ian Curtis
  • John Dalton
  • John Rylands

Votes can be cast online at https://www.cartridgesave.co.uk/printwhatmatters/dayinthelife/ and will stay open until February 19th.

The Day In The Life project in April 2017 was led by award-winning photographer Mark Waugh and saw an army of street photographers capture 24 hours in the city with their cameras.

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Salford street art by Liz Bleakley

More than 1,500 images were collected, ranging from the city’s rough sleepers, to party goers, buskers, hipsters, footie fans, bikers and wildlife.

Once the votes are cast, Nathan, 28, who first came to prominence after reaching the semi-final of Britain’s Got Talent in 2011, will set to work creating one of his famous collage artworks.

The artist, who is based in Wales, has recently created collage portraits of Prince Charles and Justin Bieber, as well as attention-grabbing artworks of Stephen Fry out of coffee, Adele from ketchup, Rowan Atkinson from beans, Bob Marley from reggae sauce and Ed Miliband from toast.

Nathan says: “I love the idea of finding someone synonymous with Manchester in the eyes of the public and then creating a piece of artwork using so many diverse images of life in the city. It’s perfect.

“A Day In The Life is a brilliant concept that captures everyday life and people and I’ve greatly enjoyed looking at all the images that were created. They will last forever in their own right and also as part of my collage.”

 

Note – the featured image at the top of the page is titled Fancy dress on Market Street Manchester by Les Telford

 



RAQIB-LEAD-IMAGE

Raqib Shaw Whitworth Gallery Review

Raqib Shaw  – Whitworth Gallery, Manchester.  A refreshing change from the norm.

If you haven’t taken a trip to the Whitworth Gallery already this summer then treat yourself to a brew in the relaxing Whitworth cafe and check out Raqib Shaw’s solo exhibition.  If, like me, you enjoy a little fantasy and opulence once in a while, then this is a must see.

Drawing on his family’s troubled past in India, current politics and Indian mythology, Kashmiri born Shaw’s surreal paintings and sculptures are fantastical, weird and wonderful with overtones of irony and eroticism. Rich in detail and colour, Shaw’s paintings are incredibly intricate and he even includes his family dogs within the scenes which are often luxuriously encrusted with rhinestones for extra opulence.

Inspired by an ancient Byzantine pottery technique known as ‘cloisonné’, Shaw’s unique painting practice involves a process of outlining each individual motif with embossed gold using a porcupine quill, then pooling and meticulously manipulating enamels and metallic paints to create a jewel-like surface – pretty impressive, I’m sure you will agree.

The exhibition is on until November so there is plenty of time to catch it.

For more information on Raqib Shaw go to

www.whitecube.com

www.whitworth.manchester.ac.uk

RAQIB1Artmuso



#MigrateProject - Alice Aedy

MIGRATE Photography Exhibition London

The MIGRATE photography exhibition on the theme of human migration opens on 29th August at Omeara in London Bridge.

Eight international photographers will display their work and an accompanying book featuring the photographs and the stories behind them will be on sale with proceeds going to Unicef’s Children of Syria Emergency Appeal.

The exhibition features a panel discussion on 31st August examining the role of photography and social media in humanitarian crises. Visitors interested in instant photography can benefit from workshops on 2nd September teaching photo techniques using classic Polaroid cameras.

The event is organised by Unicef’s NEXTGen London and supported by analogue instant photography company the Impossible Project.

MIGRATE is running an Instagram competition for submissions from anywhere in the world, giving entrants the chance to be included in the exhibition in the form of a carefully-selected digital display.

#MigrateProject - Cyrus Mahboubian

#MigrateProject – Cyrus Mahboubian

For more information visit: www.nextgenlondon.com
To buy tickets go to: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/migrate-exhibition-opening-book-launch-in-aid-of-unicef-tickets-36807529311
For the Instagram competition keep an eye on: https://www.instagram.com/migrateofficial/

Featured image at top of page by Alice Aedy



anxieteam-1

Anxieteam

Take one part UK doodler and one part German art anarchist, give them a keyboard and a ukulele and sit back in wonderment at the music of Anxieteam.

This was the second time we were meeting up with Nottingham-based illustrator Jon Burgerman but the first time under the pretext of discussing his new venture, a band with pARTner in crime Jim Avignon, an artist and musician that believes in free art for everyone; we knew it would be entertaining.

We had an insight into Jon’s work last year when he designed our cover artwork with what is still the most popular cover to date and it was a pleasure to find out about his musical talents and to get to know Jim, a German-born New Yorker who has form in both the art world and the music industry.

Jim’s unorthodox approach to the art market has seen him giveaway 800 pieces of his art in a lottery at a museum that was covered in his paintings. He even gatecrashed Germany’s Documenta exhibition and spent three weeks outside the building painting three metre canvasses before jumping through them, getting motorcycles to drive through them and otherwise destroying the art. It was, as Jim puts it, ‘focussing on how the art market and the art world are connected, how the price of artwork creates the importance of the work.’ His aim was to create the art, let people take photos for posterity and then take away the value of the piece by its destruction.

It was art that brought Jim and Jon together in a Brooklyn exhibition that Jon was originally scheduled to do as a solo project. However, after emailing Jim they agreed to do the exhibition together despite having never actually met previously. “It could have gone terribly badly. We decided that it wouldn’t be a joint exhibition where one wall would be Jim’s work and the other wall would be my work, that we would paint on each others paintings; a proper collaboration. It was a really fun week, we worked really hard but it was a pleasure to do so, who wouldn’t love to do that for a week? Paint and draw and talk about things and listen to music, it was a real fun time.”

While Jon admits he hasn’t gone to ‘some of the extreme lengths that Jim has done’ when it comes to art anarchy, he does like to keep his work accessible – something our cover artwork is testament to. Jim is of a like mind and explained, “In my opinion art should be made for everybody; everybody should be able to afford it.” This was no more so in evidence than in 2009 where Jim drew portraits of people at a Hamburg exhibition from his home in Brooklyn via Skype. “I could see people sitting in a booth. I did a drawing, a three minute portrait, and scanned it and sent it and they printed it out and took it home for free.”

Art collaborations developed into music collaborations when Jim pitched the idea of forming a band to Jon who, after some deliberation, recorded the vocals in Nottingham, sent them to Jim in Brooklyn who put a song together and played it at a New York gallery’s closing event. Jon tells us, “people seemed to like it and it went down quite well, so the next time I went to New York, I met up with Jim again and we just started doing stuff.”

Although Jon insisted explaining their sound was a difficult question, he immediately gave us a pretty comprehensive description. “It’s sort of low-fi electronic noises with erm, a smattering of ukulele, but we’re very crafted, simple with catchy melodies underpinning it all. We try and keep things simple but very melodic and colourful in its music. I think we listen to lots of different genres of music and rather than taking something sonically from those as inspiration. I would say we get inspired by bands that leave you in a good feeling or that have a nice sort of quality to them rather than like ooh, try and make it sound like this or that. I mean, I’m not a super proficient, technical musician at all so I don’t analyse music in a way that I try and replicate a certain technical element of it. I’d rather have a song that is memorable and you hum it to yourself or you enjoy listening to it, and it gives you a pleasant kind of experience for the short while you’re listening.”

With songs about eating Soya and being a cat, combined with unusual musical arrangements, we asked if there were similarities between Jon’s art and the music. Was the music an ‘audio doodle’? “Yea, definitely, stylistically, it’s like a sonic representation of the way that I would work in a drawn manner, but it’s a little different whereas I might do a drawing and it might take a minute, songs just by their nature, composing something and having a structure, it’d be misleading to call it a doodle. It’s not like something’s just plonked out and there it is, it might have a light feel to it but it’s actually very meticulously planned and honed and polished and you know, made to work, which you don’t necessarily have to do with an illustration, you can do a drawing quite quickly and it might magically just work. We definitely want the music to have a nice effortless quality, we don’t want it to sound laboured, but actually behind the scenes they’re very much honed.”

anxieteam-2We knew the time was coming when we’d have to ask the inevitable questions of choosing between music and art. “I get asked that a lot”, Jim explained. “The art is the one thing I’m kind of guaranteed to make a living from, but the music is the one that has my soul inside so er, sometimes people ask me if I’d prefer to be blind or deaf…” Jon interrupts by suggesting being poked in one eye and blocking up an ear as some kind of compromise which helped lighten the severity of Jim’s revelation.

“Personally I would lose more if I couldn’t do the music,” he went on to clarify. “Doing the art is more like doing some kind of work, doing the big works is more like, I have to work now. So it’s like, get up early, do the work. But with music it never feels like work, I always enjoy it. It’s like you’re looking for something, you don’t know what it is and it’s that moment you find it. It could be a tune, some weird arrangement idea, I really enjoy that process of finding it.”

Jon’s response was less surprising given what we know about him, “I love listening to music but playing it live and creating new songs with someone is fairly new to me.” Given just how unfamiliar it was to be a musician and lead singer in a signed band, we asked just how scary it is to play live to people. “It is scary, I’m not a performer, I’m not a singer or a dancer or anything so to do that is very scary, but that’s exciting. It’s nice actually to do both, to have a period of time doing music and enjoy that and get excited about that and then you forget about some of the work of painting, you forget about some of that hard drudgery, and so when you go back to it it’s fun again for a bit. So it’s been good this year doing a little bit of each.

“I like the real time aspect of it, I’ve done a lot of live painting and I guess it’s a similar kind of thing where you’re creating something in front of people and that’s exciting because every time it’s a bit different and their reactions will influence how it goes, and that’s nice to have that feedback, to see people’s reaction to your work immediately, you don’t get that so much when you have a painting on the wall… unless you stay in the gallery all day watching people’s faces…”

“I think if you sing and stand on stage you learn something new about yourself,” added Jim. “I think that’s also a reason why a lot of artists started in music as well. It’s a different way of expressing what’s going on with you or what you want to say.”

Before we let the guys get ready for their gig we asked them to tell us the story behind the band’s name. “We did an exhibition together in Brooklyn, and for that Jon suggested the name Anxiety Room because Jon is a very anxious person. He sees dangers everywhere, and he thought from knowing my art I would be the same, but it turns out I am blind to any possible dangers (both laugh) so we did that exhibition about anxieties and it turned out to be not a very scary exhibition, it rather turned into a funny thing. When we came up with the idea to have a band we thought we’d stay with that theme and we played around with words and we liked the combination of anxiety and team like to present us as Jon’s the Mr Anxiety and I’m the Mr Team, or like staying together and fighting anxieties. I don’t know. It sounded good. We liked it. We took it.”

www.anxieteam.com www.hellothor.com www.jonburgerman.com www.jimavignon.com

This article was first published in our partner magazine in November 2010.



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Win Tickets to Festival No.6

Festival No.6 – Portmeirion’s award winning music, arts and culture festival.

A festival unlike any other, in a place like no other, Festival No.6 is an intimate, bespoke banquet of music, arts and culture, taking place over the weekend of the 1-4 September in the magical village of Portmeirion, Wales, home of the cult TV series The Prisoner.

The carefully curated and eclectic line-up includes Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds, Hot Chip, Bastille, C Duncan, Django Django, Echo & The Bunnymen, Frances, JP Cooper, Lucy Rose, Oh Wonder, Super Furry Animals, Temples, Broken Social Scene and DJ sets from Andrew Weatherall, Ben UFO, The 2 Bears and Maribou State as well as an arts and culture programme that includes Irvine Welsh, Shaun Ryder, John Cooper Clarke and Catrin Finch plus many more.

Acts will perform across the entire site, by the whimsical Italianate architecture of the village, the historic town hall, piazza, Bristol Colonnade, the picturesque Estuary stage, the atmospheric woods and the promenade along the River Dwyryd.

Constructed between 1925 and 1975 by maverick architect Sir Clough Williams-Ellis, Portmeirion is a wonderfully bizarre and elaborate interpretation of a Mediterranean villa, nestled in the stunning mountains and forests of North Wales overlooking the expansive estuarial waters of the Irish Sea.

For more information and tickets, visit www.festivalnumber6.com

Win Tickets for you and a friend

All you have to do to be in with a chance of winning is like or comment on our facebook page https://www.facebook.com/artmuso before August 14th at midday.

n06-festival--1466514286

 

COMPETITION T&C’S

T&C’s: Prize includes one pair (two tickets) of adult weekend tickets. Each ticket admits one person. One person in the group must be aged over 18 (NB children under the age of 10 years do not require a ticket). Travel is not included. The prize is non-refundable and no cash alternative will be offered. The prize is non transferable and ID will be required at time of collecting the ticket wristband upon arrival. The prize includes all events and activities at Festival No.6 (subject to availability) but not food and drink from any stalls or bar. Winner chosen at random.



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Brand new festival at iconic Jodrell Bank

Jean-Michel Jarre, Underworld, and Caribou are to headline ‘bluedot’ the new festival that promises to blend music, art, and science, with Prof. Brian Cox also appearing as part of Radio 4’s The Infinite Monkey Cage.

Jodrell Bank, the iconic observatory in Cheshire, sees the new 3-day event take place from 22-24 July with the backdrop of the giant Lovell radio telescope piercing the countryside.

Jean-Michel is known for incredible live performances as are Underworld, and electronica fans will also want a piece of the influential Caribou.

Other artists featuring on the first wave of the line-up are electro-rock darlings Everything Everything, art-rock archivists Public Service Broadcasting, neo-psychedelic titans Mercury Rev, folk experimentalist Steve Mason, post math-rock instrumentalists 65daysofstatic, genre-transcending indie rockers British Sea Power and Californian space-rock adventurers Moon Duo.

The late-night electronic line-up promises to be equally impressive with the initial bill including Erol Alkan and Richard Norris’ electro-house alter egos Beyond the Wizards Sleeve, Hessle Audio founder Ben UFO and turntable maestro DJ Yoda with many more still to be announced.

Recording an episode at the festival is Radio 4’s The Infinite Monkey Cage with Prof. Brian Cox and Robin Ince. Their irreverent and amusing insight into some of science’s biggest questions is guaranteed to entertain and elucidate and will undoubtedly be a highlight of the festival.

slide_5hFestival goers will experience five distinct arenas featuring space orchestras, talks, screenings, lectures, comedy and debates and a vast spectrum of hands-on activities including the Luminarium, art installations, robot workshops, a planetarium, the Galaxy Garden, pulsar hunting, and graphene making classes.

A nod to Carl Sagan’s pale blue dot, the festival aims to “blow people’s minds with some amazing music and some incredible ideas – from the Big Bang to black holes, AI to climate change, and loads more.” According to Associate Director of Jodrell Bank, Professor Tim O’Brien.

Find out more about bluedot at discoverthebluedot.com



SHITJON

Artist Preview for Wateraid’s Sh!t Show

If you haven’t already got the date in your diary then mark down 19th November for World Toilet Day: Create your own poop emoji, #BeAThinker on Twitter, and get down to 103 Norfolk Street, New York, between 20-22 November to see some iconic artists supporting Wateraid to raise awareness as part of World Toilet Day 2015.

The Sh!t Show – artist preview

Jon Burgerman

SHITJONYou will probably recognise the distinctive art and doodles of British born talent Jon Burgerman: if not then you are in for a treat.  Currently living in NYC, Jon studied Fine Art in the UK before embarking on his career as an artist.  With an impressive list of collaborations with brands such as Coca Cola, Sky and Puma (to name a few) his quirky artwork has achieved international success and can be seen in galleries and installations to computer games and interiors.

Jon will be working with WaterAid at the Sh!t Show to build a giant ‘Poop World’, transforming his doodles to create fun free standing sculptures to highlight the importance of good sanitation.

If you would like to know more about Jon please visit his website: www.jonburgerman.com

 

Geo Law

SHITGEOSheffield’s own street artist and doodler Geo Law will be working on a 20’ wall completing a live mural throughout the course of the Show.

Born in Huddersfield in the UK, Geo specialises in graphic illustration and bespoke murals. Influenced by pop culture and his love of computer games his graphic style and playful characters pay homage to comic book heroes, Japanese anime and cartoons.

The mural will illustrate the dangers and difficulties of inadequate water and sanitation and highlight the positive change that occurs within those communities where Wateraid has worked.

If you would like to know more about Geo please visit his website.

www.getaloadageo.co.uk

 

Susanne Walström

SHITSUSANNEWith 25 years experience in editorial and advertising, Swedish born Susan Walström has become internationally renown for her beautiful photography. Her genuine interest in people and how they relate to their environment is apparent in her signature style, combining wit and humour with the subtleties and uniqueness of her subjects.

With a keen interest in environmental issues, Susanne will be exhibiting a collection of photographs taken in southern India, addressing the issues faced by women in particular due to a distinct lack of toilets and sanitation.

“More than 600 million people in India lack access to toilets. It is especially difficult for women. Instead of toilets they use the fields before sunrise or after sunset. The fields are riddled with snakes, sharp thorn bushes and wild dogs, and there is the very real risk of assault and rape by men preying on the women in their most vulnerable state. My pictures are taken in Tamil Nadu in southern India.”  Susanne Walström

If you would like to know more about Susanne please visit her website: www.walstrom.eu

 

For a full list of artists and for more information on the show visit our article here.



The Shit Show

The Shit Show

An exhibition not to be missed – if you give a shit about World Toilet Day that is.

November 19th is World Toilet Day – when charities like Wateraid and organisations such as UNICEF raise awareness of the 2.3 billion people (that’s one in every three people on the planet) who don’t have access to a proper toilet.

It seems remarkable that a third of the world’s population don’t have sanitation facilities given the standard of living we’re used to in the ‘West’.

Wateraid are hoping to pique interest with The Shit Show, a free, poop-themed interactive gallery featuring art from some of America’s most acclaimed artists and something of a fun approach to a serious issue.

Currently confirmed artists include: Yoni Alter, Jon Burgerman, Nick Chaffe, Jhowee Chiang, Madeleine diGangi, Alan Foreman, Jacob Fradkin, Andy Gilmore, Dave Krugman, Anna Laytham, Mick Marston, Roger Mason, Caroline Melisa, Al Murphy, Alvin Ong & Cheri Ong, Diana Park, Robert Petrie, Matthew Reid, Ashkahn Shahparnia, Chairman Ting, Jessica May Underwood, Libby Vanderploeg and Susanne Walström.

The event is free to the public and will be held between 20-22nd November from 11am to 6pm at 103 Norfolk Street at Delancy Street – so if you’re in New York then get yourself down there to experience the shit!

You’ll have the chance to take a deep dive into the issue by interacting with various installations and viewing Wateraid’s award winning film Across the Tracks. Artwork from The Shit Show will be available for sale to benefit WaterAid’s water and sanitation programs in 37 countries across the globe.

Find out more about Wateraid in your country by visiting http://www.wateraid.org



Music Box by Kathy Hinde

Manchester Enlightened this December

International artists meet local talent at the Enlighten Manchester Festival of Light and Sound Art nestled in the heart of the German Christmas Market at the Central Library and Bridgewater Hall this December 10th – 12th.

With over 15 installations plus performances and talks, the festival celebrates light, sound, and literature, as part of UNESCO’s International Year of Light.

Boasting a world premiere of The Bremen Town Musicians, a music and live animation work inspired by the bestselling author Philip Pullman’s new translation of the Brothers Grimm fairy tales, the festival features a number of internationally acclaimed and award-winning artists.

Light artist Paul Friedlander, audio visual artist Kathy Hinde, and light and sound artist Ulf Pedersen will all exhibit world premieres as they headline the event.

Luminous Birds by Kathy Hinde

Luminous Birds by Kathy Hinde

Local artists include Scotsman Poet of the Year Adelle Stripe, graphic designer Trevor Johnson, light artist Elisa Artesero and photographer Andrew Brooks. Neon artist Richard William Wheater is working with Manchester-based youth leadership project RECLAIM sharing young people’s vision of what the city could look like in the future.

Following a successful pilot last year the festival will launch a new relationship with the extraordinary Manchester Central Library as the main venue to bring together exciting local and international talent, skills and energy with an ambitious programme after dark. Light works will also be on show at The Bridgewater Hall from leading audio visual artist Kathy Hinde and Liverpool contemporary composer Matthew Fairclough.

Andy Brydon, Curated Place and festival director said: “Being able to deliver the first full outing of a light festival in Manchester as part of the UNESCO International Year of Light with Central Library and The Bridgewater Hall is the best way we could launch a relationship with these brilliant venues.

“We’re all looking towards developing the light festival as an annual event to inject some high quality public arts into Manchester’s Christmas Celebrations. This year we have some of the UK’s leading sound and light artists collaborating at the boundaries of their disciplines helping us develop the festival from a pilot to a major family event. Next year we’re hoping for more.”

 

1000 Birds by Kathy Hinde

1000 Birds by Kathy Hinde

Enlighten Manchester will take place on the following dates:

  • Thursday 10th December: 4.30-8.00 pm (with launch performance from Psappha and Enrica Sciandrone from 6pm)
  • Friday 10th December: 5.30-8.00 pm
  • Saturday 10th December: 5.30-8.00 pm

Locations: Manchester Central Library, Bridgewater Hall

Price: Free-£5, booking required for Manchester Central Library

For more information visit http://www.enlightenmanchester.co.uk/